THE FIRST MEN IN THE MOON

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Author: H. G. Wells (1866 –1946)
Publisher: Dover Publications Inc (2001 Edition)
Bought from: NoQ Store

Introduction

Herbert George Wells, better known as H. G. Wells, is one of the most influential early science fiction writers. Many of his works are still read and adapted even today.

Wells was born in England to a working class family. He was an avid reader during his childhood. He secured a scholarship in 1883 to the Normal School of Science (now part of Imperial College, London) where he studied biology under Thomas Henry Huxley, the grandfather of Aldous Huxley. After he was finally conferred his degree in 1980, he embarked on his prodigious writing career. In 1895, The Time Machine (1895) became a commercial success. Wells followed that up with a now-legendary series of early scifi classics, The Island of Doctor Moreau (1896), The Invisible Man (1897), The War of the Worlds (1898) and The First Men in the Moon (1901). This set led to Wells being known as the Father of Science Fiction alongside Jules Verne (1828 – 1905).

In the new millennium, Wells’ non-fiction oeuvre became more prominent. This included Anticipations of the Reaction of Mechanical and Scientific Progress upon Human Life and Thought (1901) in which he envisioned, inter alia, economic globalisation; The World Set Free (1914) in which he described the splitting of the atom and the creation of the atomic bomb; and The Outline of History (1920) in which Wells’ survey of history from the creation of earth to WWI concluded with the portent of another world war. The uncanny accuracy of some of Wells’ predictions led to him being known also as the Father of Futurism.

He became an active socialist and was a firm believer in a world government.

What is the about?

Cavor, a scientist, invented a substance that is “opaque” (ie resistant) to gravitation (p 9 – 10). He and the narrator, a failed businessman named Bedford, flew to the moon in a sphere made from the material. There, they discovered a subterranean civilisation of insectoid creatures. So, the protagonists were indeed the first men in the moon.

Themes

H. G. Wells’ science fiction works were influenced by the time he lived in. The Industrial Revolution (c 1760 – 1840) paved the way to amazing scientific, technology and engineering advances, including massive improvements in modes of transportation. Steamships and railways (both first used in the previous century) entered the modern age during the 19th century. The first inter-city railway line in the world (Liverpool – Manchester) opened in 1830 while the first inter-city line into London (London – Birmingham) opened in 1838, one year after the coronation of Queen Victoria. In 1819, the steamer/sailing ship hybrid SS Savannah became the first steamship to cross the Atlantic. The SS Sirius, a purpose-built steamer, took just over 18 days to sail from Cork, Ireland to New York in 1838; by the 1890s, ocean liners were making transatlantic crossings in about 5 days. Aviation was, however, still in its infancy: Count von Zepellin launched the first of the airships that would carry his name in 1900 and the Wright Brothers would carry out the first sustained, controlled, powered aircraft flight in 1903. Space travel was pure fantasy in the 19th century. Jules Verne beat Wells to this idea with his novel De la terre à la lune or From the Earth to the Moon (1865). Neither Verne nor Wells lived to see the first manned space flight on Vostok 1 (12 April 1961) or the first men to reach the moon via Apollo 11 (21 July 1969).

Another technology that was emerging during Wells’ lifetime was radio transmission. Nikola Tesla pioneered the field of transmission of radio waves but history remembers Guglielmo Marconi′s reported trans-Atlantic transmission in 1901. In The First Men on the Moon, Wells described a radio transmission from the moon to earth (p 129) and then described the Selenites’ jamming of the transmission (p 158–9)

Even though he most likely never actually experienced weightlessness, Wells demonstrated his uncanny power of prediction with his description of the phenomenon: “Then I perceived an unaccountable change in my bodily sensations. It was a feeling of lightness, of unreality. Coupled with that was a queer sensation in the head, an apoplectic effect almost, and a thumping of blood vessels at the ears” (p 27).

In The First Men on the Moon, Cavor was a benign man of science resembling more the narrator in The Time Machine and less the mad scientists in The Island of Doctor Moreau and The Invisible Man. Bedford on the other hand was a homo economicus, a failed businessman who jumped at the possibility for the commercial exploitation of Cavor’s technology: “I saw a parent company, and daughter companies, applications to right of us, applications to left, rings and trusts, privileges, and concessions spreading and spreading, until one vast, stupendous Cavorite company ran and ruled the world” (p 10). Given Wells’ socialist leaning, it is surprising that Bedford is not a more obvious villain.

Wells’ political views can be gleaned from his expository passages on the rigidly-hierarchical society of the Selenites (Chaps 23 – 25). For instance, he appeared to admire the way worker Selenites who are not needed simply go into a form of hibernation until they are called on as compared to the practice in capitalist England and America: “To drug the worker one does not want and toss him aside is surely far better than to expel him from his factory to wander starving in the streets. In every complicated social community there is necessarily a certain intermittency of employment for all specialised labour, and in this way the trouble of an ‘unemployed’ problem is altogether anticipated” (p 147).

What about the book?

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This is a Dover Thrift Edition so there is nothing by way of additional materials. Five of Wells’ best known novellas are marketed as part of a boxed set. Wells’ science fiction works are in the public domain. But this set of 5 books for $10.78 is reasonably priced.

Finally …

The novel was written just over a century ago. Some of the words and phrases will be a little alien to today’s readers but this is not insurmountable. The story is fresh and well-paced.

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THE WAR OF THE WORLDS

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Author: H. G. Wells (1866 –1946)
Publisher: Dover Publications Inc
Bought from: NoQ Store

Introduction

Herbert George Wells, better known as H. G. Wells, is one of the most influential early science fiction writers. Many of his works are still read and adapted even today.

Wells was born in England to a working class family. He was an avid reader during his childhood. He secured a scholarship in 1883 to the Normal School of Science (now part of Imperial College, London) where he studied biology under Thomas Henry Huxley, the grandfather of Aldous Huxley. After he was finally conferred his degree in 1980, he embarked on his prodigious writing career. In 1895, The Time Machine (1895) became a commercial success. Wells followed that up with a now-legendary series of early scifi classics, The Island of Doctor Moreau (1896), The Invisible Man (1897), The War of the Worlds (1898) and The First Men in the Moon (1901). This set led to Wells being known as the Father of Science Fiction alongside Jules Verne (1828 – 1905).

In the new millennium, Wells’ non-fiction oeuvre became more prominent. This included Anticipations of the Reaction of Mechanical and Scientific Progress upon Human Life and Thought (1901) in which he envisioned, inter alia, economic globalisation; The World Set Free (1914) in which he described the splitting of the atom and the creation of the atomic bomb; and The Outline of History (1920) in which Wells’ survey of history from the creation of earth to WWI concluded with the portent of another world war. The uncanny accuracy of some of Wells’ predictions led to him being known also as the Father of Futurism.

He became an active socialist and was a firm believer in a world government.

What is the about?

No one would have believed in the last years of the nineteenth century that this world was being watched keenly and closely by intelligences greater than man’s and yet as mortal as his own; that as men busied themselves about their various concerns they were scrutinised and studied, perhaps almost as narrowly as a man with a microscope might scrutinise the transient creatures that swarm and multiply in a drop of water. With infinite complacency men went to and fro over this globe about their little affairs, serene in their assurance of their empire over matter. It is possible that the infusoria under the microscope do the same. No one gave a thought to the older worlds of space as sources of human danger, or thought of them only to dismiss the idea of life upon them as impossible or improbable. It is curious to recall some of the mental habits of those departed days. At most terrestrial men fancied there might be other men upon Mars, perhaps inferior to themselves and ready to welcome a missionary enterprise. Yet across the gulf of space, minds that are to our minds as ours are to those of the beasts that perish, intellects vast and cool and unsympathetic, regarded this earth with envious eyes, and slowly and surely drew their plans against us. And early in the twentieth century came the great disillusionment.

So begins The War of the Worlds, a first person narrative of a Martian invasion.

Themes

H. G. Wells’ science fiction works were influenced by the time he lived in. Queen Victoria ruled over the British Empire at the height of its military and colonial power. However, there was a general sense of unease about foreign powers, especially after the Prussians defeated France in the Franco-Prussian War (1870 – 1871) and Britain’s heavy losses in the Boer Wars (1880 – 1881 and 1899 – 1902). In The War of the Worlds, England found herself at the business end of an invasion by a ruthless adversary with superior weaponry. Wells would later write The War in the Air (1907) about a German invasion of the US. He was the Tom Clancy of his time!

The Victorian era also witnessed great scientific, technology and engineering advances in the wake of the Industrial Revolution (c 1760 – 1840). Charles Darwin had rocked the scientific world with his description of evolution through natural selection in his book On the Origin of Species (1859). His theory of natural selection and evolution was accepted and opposed in equal measures in Victorian England — something that persists even today. The conflict between the Martians and the Earthlings is an allusion to natural selection at work. It was survival of the fittest on an epic scale. In Chapter 7 of Part 2, the artillery man compared the conflict to men′s attempt to control pests:

“This isn’t a war,” said the artilleryman. “It never was a war, any more than there’s war between man and ants …
It′s just men and ants. There′s the ants builds their cities, live their lives, have wars, revolutions, until the men want them out of the way, and then they go out of the way. That′s what we are now–just ants. Only—-”

“Yes,” I said.

“We’re eatable ants.”

The artillery man recognised that it was futile to resist the Martians and suggested that mankind should adapt to live underground.

The Industrial Revolution also modernised the military weapons and equipment which the British Army used to devastating effect around the world. In The War of the Worlds, the Martians had the upper hand with their superior technology. In the end, however, they succumbed to Earth’s humble microbes because their bodies were not adapted to deal with these bacteria.

The Martians used several weapons that foreshadow actual applications. In Chapter 5 of Part 1, the Martians used the Heat-Ray to annihilate a group of curious onlookers:

An almost noiseless and blinding flash of light, and a man fell headlong and lay still; and as the unseen shaft of heat passed over them, pine trees burst into fire, and every dry furze bush became with one dull thud a mass of flames. And far away towards Knaphill I saw the flashes of trees and hedges and wooden buildings suddenly set alight.

It was sweeping round swiftly and steadily, this flaming death, this invisible, inevitable sword of heat. I perceived it coming towards me by the flashing bushes it touched, and was too astounded and stupefied to stir. I heard the crackle of fire in the sand pits and the sudden squeal of a horse that was as suddenly stilled. Then it was as if an invisible yet intensely heated finger were drawn through the heather between me and the Martians, and all along a curving line beyond the sand pits the dark ground smoked and crackled.

In the next chapter, the narrator speculated about the scientific basis of the weapon. Actual laser weapons would be developed within 50 years after Wells wrote the book.

The Martians’ other weapon was the Black Smoke, first used in London after the Martians lost a fighting machine. The Black Smoke instantly suffocated every person that came into contact with it but had no effect on buildings and other physical objects. The Black Smoke foreshadowed the mustard gas used in the World War I and other chemical weapons that have since been developed.

Both weapons were deployed by the Martian fighting machines known as Tripods, perhaps the most iconic and enduring image from the novel. In Chapter 10 of Part 1, the narrator described the first Tripods he saw:

And this Thing I saw! How can I describe it? A monstrous tripod, higher than many houses, striding over the young pine trees, and smashing them aside in its career; a walking engine of glittering metal, striding now across the heather; articulate ropes of steel dangling from it, and the clattering tumult of its passage mingling with the riot of the thunder. A flash, and it came out vividly, heeling over one way with two feet in the air, to vanish and reappear almost instantly as it seemed, with the next flash, a hundred yards nearer. Can you imagine a milking stool tilted and bowled violently along the ground? That was the impression those instant flashes gave. But instead of a milking stool imagine it a great body of machinery on a tripod stand …

Seen nearer, the Thing was incredibly strange, for it was no mere insensate machine driving on its way. Machine it was, with a ringing metallic pace, and long, flexible, glittering tentacles (one of which gripped a young pine tree) swinging and rattling about its strange body. It picked its road as it went striding along, and the brazen hood that surmounted it moved to and fro with the inevitable suggestion of a head looking about. Behind the main body was a huge mass of white metal like a gigantic fisherman’s basket, and puffs of green smoke squirted out from the joints of the limbs as the monster swept by me.

As far as I know, there is no real life version of these fighting machines. Yet!

What about the book?

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This is a Dover Thrift Edition so there is nothing by way of additional materials. Five of Wells’ best known novellas are marketed as part of a boxed set. Wells’ science fiction works are in the public domain. But this set of 5 books for $10.78 is reasonably priced.

Finally …

The novel was written over a century ago − some of the language will be a little (pardon the pun) alien to today’s readers but this is not insurmountable. This is the most epic of Wells’ early science fiction works.

THE INVISIBLE MAN

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Author: H. G. Wells (1866 –1946)
Publisher: Dover Publications Inc (1992 edition)
Bought from: NoQ Store

Introduction

Herbert George Wells, better known as H. G. Wells, is one of the most influential early science fiction writers. Many of his works are still read and adapted even today. Wells was born in England to a working class family. He was an avid reader during his childhood. He secured a scholarship in 1883 to the Normal School of Science (now part of Imperial College, London) where he studied biology under Thomas Henry Huxley, one of Charles Darwin’s fiercest supporter (he is known as “Darwin’s Bulldog”). After he was finally conferred his degree in 1980, he embarked on his prodigious writing career. In 1895, the novella The Time Machine was published and became a commercial success. Wells followed that up with a series of novellas, The Island of Doctor Moreau (1896), The Invisible Man (1897) and The War of the Worlds (1898), all of which are now considered sci fi classics. This set of work in particular led to Wells being known as the Father of Science Fiction, a title he shares with Jules Verne (1828 –1905) and Hugo Gernsback (1884 – 1967).

Wells continued writing fiction in the new millennium but he would never replicate the same level of success. He became better known for his non-fiction oeuvre. This included Anticipations of the Reaction of Mechanical and Scientific Progress upon Human Life and Thought (1901) in which he envisioned, inter alia, economic globalisation; The World Set Free (1914) in which he described the splitting of the atom and the creation of the atomic bomb; and The Outline of History (1920) in which Wells’ survey of history from the creation of earth to WWI concluded with the portent of another world war. The uncanny accuracy of some of Wells’ predictions led to him being known also as the Father of Futurism.

He was an active socialist and a firm believer in a world government.

What is the about?

Griffin, a budding scientist, discovered how to make things invisible by lowering the refractive index of a substance to that of air (p 64). He was seduced by all the possibility that the power might endow on him — “the mystery, the power, the freedom” (p 66). But he soon learned that alone, he could achieve little. Driven mad by desperation, he hatched a plan to establish a “Reign of Terror” (p 91) over a little town, terrifying and dominating the townfolk to carry out his orders.

Themes

H. G. Wells’ science fiction works were influenced by the time he lived in. The Industrial Revolution (c 1760 – 1840) paved the way to amazing scientific, technology and engineering advances. But there was considerable ambivalence whether all these advances were ultimately beneficial to society or not.

The Invisible Man can be intepreted as a parable of the danger posed by science without a moral compass. The main character Griffin, is a typical mad scientist, like Well′s own Dr Moreau (1896) and earlier prototypes Mary Shelley′s Victor Frankenstein (1818) and Robert Louise Stevenson′s Dr Jeykll (1886).

Another theme that is explored in the novella is an age-old question that Plato articulated in the story of the Ring of Gyges in The Republic (c 380 BCE): what would someone do if he had a magical ring that would render him invisible and thus allow him to do anything without being discovered. Plato wrote: “No man would keep his hands off what was not his own when he could safely take what he liked out of the market, or go into houses and lie with any one at his pleasure, or kill or release from prison whom he would, and in all respects be like a God among men” (Benjamin Jowett translation).

What about the book?

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This is a Dover Thrift Edition so there is nothing by way of additional materials. Five of Wells′ best known novellas are marketed as part of a boxed set. Wells’ science fiction works are in the public domain. But this set of 5 books for $10.78 is reasonably priced.

Finally …

In 2013, more than 100 years after the publication of The Invisible Man, scientists in the US, China, London and even Singapore′s Nanyang Technological University were reported to be making progress in cloaking technology. Maybe another 100 years …?

THE ISLAND OF DR MOREAU

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Author: H. G. Wells (1866 –1946)
Publisher: Dover Publications Inc (1996 edition)
Bought from: NoQ Store

Introduction

Herbert George Wells, better known as H. G. Wells, is one of the most influential early science fiction writers. Many of his works are still read and adapted even today. Wells was born in England to a working class family. He was an avid reader during his childhood. He secured a scholarship in 1883 to the Normal School of Science (now part of Imperial College, London) where he studied biology under Thomas Henry Huxley, one of Charles Darwin’s fiercest supporter (he is known as “Darwin’s Bulldog”). After he was finally conferred his degree in 1980, he embarked on his prodigious writing career. In 1895, the novella The Time Machine was published and became a commercial success. Wells followed that up with a series of novellas, The Island of Doctor Moreau (1896), The Invisible Man (1897) and The War of the Worlds (1898), all of which are now considered sci fi classics. This set of work in particular led to Wells being known as the Father of Science Fiction, a title he shares with Jules Verne (1828 –1905) and Hugo Gernsback (1884 – 1967).

Wells continued writing fiction in the new millennium but he would never replicate the same level of success. He became better known for his non-fiction oeuvre, This included Anticipations of the Reaction of Mechanical and Scientific Progress upon Human Life and Thought (1901) in which he envisioned, inter alia, economic globalisation; The World Set Free (1914) in which he described the splitting of the atom and the creation of the atomic bomb; and The Outline of History (1920) in which Wells’ survey of history from the creation of earth to WWI concluded with the portent of another world war. The uncanny accuracy of some of Wells’ predictions led to him being known also as the Father of Futurism.

He was an active socialist and a firm believer in a world government.

What is the story about?

The narrator Edward Prendick found himself stranded on a remote island where Dr. Moreau was transforming animal into humanoids, both physically and mentally:

“… it is a possible thing to transplant tissue from one part of an animal to another or from one animal to another, to alter its chemical reactions and methods of growth, to modify the articulations of its limbs, and indeed to change it in its most intimate structure.”
(p 53)

“The mental structure is even less determinate than the bodily. In our growing science of hypnotism we find the promise of a possibility of replacing old inherent instincts by new suggestions, grafting upon or replacing the inherited fixed ideas.”
(p 54)

But Dr. Moreau himself had to admit that he had not perfected the process:

“As soon as my hand is taken from them the beast begins to creep back, begins to reassert itself again …”
(p 59)

Themes

H. G. Wells’ science fiction works were influenced by the time he lived in. The Industrial Revolution (c 1760 – 1840) paved the way to great scientific, technology and engineering advances, including Charles Darwin’s description of evolution through natural selection in his book On the Origin of Species (1859).

Animals and animal-human hybrids have been part of mankind’s imagination since the earliest men. For example, the famous lion man statue found in Hohlenstein Mountain, Germany is estimated to be 40,000 years old. Later incarnations include various Egyptian and Indian gods and Greek mythological monsters. In The Island of Dr. Moreau, Dr Moreau used vivisection to create his own chimeras. This term vivisection refers to experiments carried out on living animals and is used today only by people opposed to such work. Animal testings can be traced back to ancient Greece but the 19th century saw the beginnings of the animal rights movements in both sides of the Atlantic. The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals was formed in 1824 (it received the royal charter in 1840) followed by the American version The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals in New York in 1866. In England, Charles Darwin himself championed the enactment of The Cruelty to Animals Act (1876), the first legislation to regulate the infliction of pain on animals during experiments. This led to the creation of the American Anti-Vivisection Society in Philadelphia in 1883 with the goal of regulation and later abolishing the practice of vivisection.

The Island of Dr Moreau can be interpreted as a parable of the danger posed by science without a moral compass. The character of Dr Moreau is a stereotypical mad scientist, like Well’s own The Invisible Man (1897) and earlier prototypes Mary Shelley’s Victor Frankenstein (1818) and Robert Louise Stevenson’s Dr Jekyll (1886).

What about the book?

SONY DSCSONY DSCSONY DSC

This is a Dover Thrift Edition so there is nothing by way of additional materials. Five of Wells’ best known novellas are marketed as part of a boxed set. Wells’ science fiction works are in the public domain. But this set of 5 books for $10.78 is reasonably priced.

Finally…

Easy and enjoyable read.

THE TIME MACHINE

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Author: H.G. Wells (1866 –1946)
Publisher: Dover Publications Inc
Bought from: NoQ Store

Introduction

Herbert George Wells, better known as H. G. Wells, is one of the most influential early science fiction writers. Many of his works are still read and adapted even today. Wells was born in England to a working class family. He was an avid reader during his childhood. He secured a scholarship in 1883 to the Normal School of Science (now part of Imperial College, London) where he studied biology under Thomas Henry Huxley, one of Charles Darwin’s fiercest supporter (he is known as “Darwin’s Bulldog”). After he was finally conferred his degree in 1980, he embarked on his prodigious writing career. In 1895, the novella The Time Machine was published and became a commercial success. Wells followed that up with a series of novellas, The Island of Doctor Moreau (1896), The Invisible Man (1897) and The War of the Worlds (1898), all of which are now considered sci fi classics. This set of work in particular led to Wells being known as the Father of Science Fiction, a title he shares with Jules Verne (1828 –1905) and Hugo Gernsback (1884 – 1967).

Wells continued writing fiction in the new millennium but he would never achieve the same level of commercial success again. He became better known for his non-fiction oeuvre, This included Anticipations of the Reaction of Mechanical and Scientific Progress upon Human Life and Thought (1901) in which he envisioned, inter alia, economic globalisation; The World Set Free (1914) in which he described the splitting of the atom and the creation of the atomic bomb; and The Outline of History (1920) in which Wells’ survey of history from the creation of earth to WWI concluded with the portent of another world war. The uncanny accuracy of some of Wells’ predictions led to him being known also as the Father of Futurism.

He was an active socialist and a firm believer in a world government.

What is the story about?

The (unnamed) Time Traveller told an amazing story of his journey to the year 802,701 CE where he encountered two species of humans. The Eloi was race of docile, childlike humans, “beautiful and graceful … but indescribably frail” (p 19) that lived on the surface of the earth. The Morlock on the other hand was a species of humanoid creatures with “pale, chinless faces and great, lidless, pinkish-grey eyes” (p 47) which had evolved to living underground and came above for their nefarious purposes only in the dark.

Escaping from that time, the Time Traveller went even further into the future where he witnessed the dying days of earth as our sun turned into what appeared to be a red giant.

Themes

H. G. Wells’ science fiction works were influenced by the time he lived in. Queen Victoria ruled over the British Empire at the height of its military and colonial power. The Industrial Revolution (c 1760 – 1840) paved the way to great scientific, technology and engineering advances. Charles Darwin had rocked the scientific world with his description of evolution through natural selection in his book On the Origin of Species (1859). But a sense of pessimism saturating the fin de siècle gave rise to the realisation that evolution is not a one-way street. Building on Darwin’s work but without knowledge of molecular genetics, the biologist E. Ray Lankester argued that it was possible for complex organisms to de-evolve into simpler ones, a process he called degeneration in his book Degeneration: A Chapter in Darwinism (1880).

The Time Traveller may be warning that degeneration could result from the decadence and arrogant self-confidence in some Victorian circles when he speculated on what had led to the condition of the Elois and their relationship with the Morlocks:

I grieved to think how brief the dream of the human intellect had been. It had committed suicide. It had set itself steadfastly towards comfort and ease, a balanced society with security and permanency as its watchword, it had attained its hopes—to come to this at last. Once, life and property must have reached almost absolute safety. The rich had been assured of his wealth and comfort, the toiler assured of his life and work. No doubt in that perfect world there had been no unemployed problem, no social question left unsolved. And a great quiet had followed.

It is a law of nature we overlook, that intellectual versatility is the compensation for change, danger, and trouble. An animal perfectly in harmony with its environment is a perfect mechanism. Nature never appeals to intelligence until habit and instinct are useless. There is no intelligence where there is no change and no need of change. Only those animals partake of intelligence that have to meet a huge variety of needs and dangers.
(p 65)

The Darwinian idea of struggle was mirrored in another struggle taking place within Victorian society itself. As a result of the Industrial Revolution, the gulf deepened between the capitalist class and the working class (proletariat). Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels gave voice to this struggle in their pamphlet The Communist Manifesto, first published in German in London (1848).

When the Time Traveller observed the Elois living not in individual houses but in large palace-like buildings, he attributed it to Communism (p 24). He described his initial impressions of the relationship between the 2 species in Marxist terms: So, in the end, above ground you must have the Haves, pursuing pleasure and comfort and beauty, and below ground the Have-nots; the Workers getting continually adapted to the conditions of their labour (p 41).

H. G. Wells first wrote about time travel in a short story The Chronic Argonauts (1888). In The Time Machine, Wells applied the concepts of four-dimensional space to explain time travel. He is credited with the first use of the term Time Machine (p 10).

What about the book?

SONY DSCSONY DSCSONY DSC

This is a Dover Thrift Edition so there is nothing by way of additional materials. Five of Wells’ best known novellas are marketed as part of a boxed set. Wells’ science fiction works are in the public domain. But this set of 5 books for $10.78 is reasonably priced.

Finally…

Easy and enjoyable read.